Posted Up With Candace Parker, Q and D | Knuckleheads S3: E5 | The Players’ Tribune

Posted Up With Candace Parker, Q and D | Knuckleheads S3: E5 | The Players’ Tribune


– Live on location, LA, California. I got the black kids one with me and we got one of the GOATs. We got one of the people
going on the Mount Rushmore for the women’s basketball
and she from Chicago. – GOAT. – We got Miss Candace
Parker in the building and we appreciate for showing
up and showing us love. – [Candace] Thanks for having me. – Check it out y’all,
this is one of the GOATs. We appreciate you, we got
greatness upon the show. You know what I’m saying? First question, we ask
everybody who come on. When you made it to the
WNBA, who’s the first person to bust your ass? – Oooh. The first person to bust my ass, I mean I got my ass busted
every day in practice ’cause I was playing with DeLisha Milton and Lisa Leslie, Tina Thompson came over. It was kinda every single day they would put me on the white team and they would be on the black team and they would take turns
not calling fouls and just– – [Darius] Goin’ at you. – So really it was pretty much
every single day in practice. – Them legends too. – Yeah, you had it on
a daily, that’s rough. – Them legends too, Lisa Leslie. – But that got you ready early, right? That’s iron sharpening iron. – I had a successful first
month of the WNBA season and I think I was feeling
myself a little bit. Michael Cooper, who was
our coach at the time, I remember the practice where we walked in and how you warm up when you’re Rookie after you had like 30– – You got the swagg going,
you are feeling yourself. – Like jog into spots
and then we scrimmaged and he called my name with the white team and I remember being
like, all right, let’s go. And then I realized that
I was not meant to win ’cause I went to the
basket and got taken out and they just kept playing. – So you’re from st
Louis, where you’re born– – I was born in St Louis. – You were born in St Louis? – She from Chicago. – I’m sorry, I apologize. – You feel me? – [Darius] From Chicago. – This is the flag. – She was born in St Louis. Tell us– – Try and throw that in there like that. – I just wanted to put like
I’ve messed with St Louis. – St Louis is nice, we still
had family and friends. We’d go back there
every summer and visit– – This is not disrespect to the loo, I’m just saying the facts are the facts. – The St. Lunatics came out
and I kinda claimed St Louis a Little bit during that time. Nellie was hot in St. Lunatics, but, I was born in St Louis
and moved when I was three and really enjoyed, I’m 11 years younger than
my brother and my brothers were my heroes growing up. So everything they did, I wanted to do. We went to the tennis courts
where playing it as hot. They took their shirts
off, I was over there trying to take my shirt off, barrettes on. So everything they did,
I just followed suit. I was a huge soccer growing up and so then they started playing basketball, so I would be in the driveway
trying to play basketball. And that was during the Bulls. We moved right when the Bulls
started winning championships. And so I remember all that. Like the repeat, the
threepeat, I remember– – People riding outside
on top of their cars, on top of vans, shooting their guns in
the air, doing everything. – I remember the commercials
to prevent riots. Like when Dennis Rodman and
Michael Jordan, Scotty Pippin got on and we’re talking about, “We wanna keep Chicago safe.” – That’s right. – That’s why I tell people all the time, I got the chance to sit
up though, me and him, we were sitting up there with
Scotty on the jump up there. I said, “Man, I don’t understand, “this hit different every single time.” It don’t matter what’s going
on, if I get around Mike or Scotty. It’s like hold on, you
know what I’m saying? They stand out to people like us more so than anybody we might meet. – It’s insane, and honestly, I was the biggest Ron Harper fan. – [Both] Right. – And Ron Harper used to
give Mike a couple fits before he got to the Bulls. I remember he was defensive. – Cleveland Cavalier Ron Harper. Clipper Ron Harper used to go to work. – When he came to Chicago,
there’s a time when my brother was playing and
it was like Michael Jordan in the hallway and Ron Harper. And I went up to Ron Harper
and got Ron Harper’s autograph and took a picture with him. And that was on my wall
from the time I was probably like nine or 10 to till
we moved out of the house. Ron Harper was like everything. – He was a key to their team, he was a key part to that team. I loved that starting
lineup with him, Mike- – It was crazy. it was the most, man, it was locked down, period, boy, everything, his problems. – It was nuts. – No point guard, just
Ron Harper out there, Scotty run at it man, just seeing Scott– – For you growing up, everybody knows MJ was everybody’s favorite player. For you, who was the female GOAT for you that you looked up to, and was your GOAT? – At 11 years old, the
WNBA started for me. The summer before, I
went out and was like, I’m about to be like Chris
Webber and like Jordan and I’m gonna shoot jump shots like that, I’m gonna be that post player that’s able to handle the ball, whatever. And then that next summer, it was like, Oh I can dream to be like female athletes. I don’t have to dream to play in the NBA, I can play in the WNBA. And Cynthia Cooper at that time, Houston Comets were winning
championship after championship. – And she came out of nowhere
from what we’re seeing. – She came out of nowhere, exactly. And I remember in my rec
game, ’cause I wasn’t playing and traveling basketball yet. My parents were very at
one spot stick to that, and then we can switch during seasons. Like we’re not going to ban
you out playing basketball. So I didn’t really start
playing the series basketball till I was like 12. And at that time, I was
playing in the Rec League and I remember I hit a
shot and raise the roof. – Raising a roof. – Yeah. So it was just, I wanted
to be like Cynthia Cooper. – Who installed the game in you? ‘Cause you play soccer,
you go great footwork. Who installed the game
in you, just to switch to be like basketball is this sport? – My dad was like, we laugh, it’s probably not funny
anymore, we called him the Joe Jackson of– It’s really not that funny anymore. But yeah, that was my dad. Before, I was playing serious basketball. We’d go to the park and
his whole thing was like, I don’t coach effort, and that was what coach
Summit always said. And he’s like, “I don’t coach effort.” So we’d go to the gym or to the park and if we were practicing
hard or something like that, he would just not say nothing,
he would just go get his keys and walk to the car and drive off. And right when he was
driving off, be like, “Yeah, you gotta be home in 20 minutes.” So he’d be running home back from the park and I remember watching this
as a kid and being like, “Man, I can’t wait til
he does that to me.” To my brothers. They’d be in the strength
shoes running beside the car. – Darius right there– – And I remember, like I
want him to yell at me, I want to come back from the
game and him to tell me off or something like that. So I guess it was just
my dad and my brothers. I wanted to do everything they did. – So it was just like you
wanted to be a part of it. – I just wanted to be a part of it. And that’s how I, like all Saturdays, I would
beg him, after I would we had our chores, I police
the yard and make sure all the leaves are up and all that stuff. – Yeah, children, hear dad. But you listen, you heard this, she said shores before anything– – [Candace] Chores and then– – Thank you. – After I finished the
chores, I’d be like, Dad, can we please go to
Edward’s Health and Fitness, is where we always went. And I’d be like, Can we
please go to Edwards? And he’d be like, “All right.” And there’s so many
memories on a Saturday. I’d be over there trying
to dunk a tennis ball. I remember the first time I did that those are the memories
I see you with my dad. – Tell me about the first
time you dunked a real ball. – It was like progression ’cause, so my brothers, this goes back to the
competition with my brothers. My brothers were five,
five and five, seven entering high school and I was six, two. And so if we grew up at the same time, their little sister
would have dwarfed them. – Yeah, they’d have been a shrimp. – I would have been
like mouse in the house. Like let’s go type of thing. – AP, say it ain’t so, brother. – Five, seven and I was, yeah, so it was like that
but that’s what it was. It was just trying to be my brothers ’cause they dunked it at 15,
16 and I was 14 and I was like, “I’m gonna dunk.” So all summer, I did string shoes. I did toe raises. Yeah, on the toe. – That was back in era with legit, you’ll be in school, you see
dudes walking around bagpipe with the joints on out. You got money, your
parents got you the love, you got the joints on TV,
like you go to East Bay. – Ours were passed down. Mine were a size, I wore a size 12 shoe and mine were size 14 ’cause they bought my brother shoes and we got ’em passed down. So I just tied them real tight
and walked around with them. – That’s classic. She had the string shoes. – I was doing toe raises on the stairs, pushups before bed at
commercial, all that. – On the stairs, toe
raising boy, that’s classic. These kids now got
trainers, got all this stuff like we was legit doing
exactly what she said. You’d be at the crib sitting
there just doing toe raises. Somebody walked past, you like whatever. – What are you doing? Like wanting to try to touch
them on the top of the wall. What else? One summer, my dad was like,
“You need to get better at your “left hand.” And I was like, “Okay.” So I ate with my left hand all summer. All summer, I just ate with my left hand to get better at it. – That’s great. Remember, that’s what Kobe said. He had his daughter, he
had her do everything, try and write left-handed,
pick things up, left handed, just use, but you can’t
use your right hand to do all of this lefthanded – [Candace] Do everything lefthanded. – That’s crazy. – That’s what it was,
and then man, one summer, I was six, two at the
time in eighth grade, in gym class, I jumped up, I remember when I dunked the tennis ball. And everybody was like, “Dang, okay.” And then that summer,
I dunked the volleyball and I couldn’t get a basketball. And then one Saturday with
my dad, I took the ball, cradled it, just went up, bop, and I remember just being so hype. I was calling my mom,
I called my brothers, my brothers were away at school and Anthony was older so he was
playing basketball overseas and it was insane. – Then you went crazy. – I went crazy. – Whole family, crazy
bro, that’s super crazy. Then you start, you making
history, you Dunkin in Illinois, the first woman to dunk in in Illinois, the first woman to dunk
in, like NCAA Tournament. How was that? – I just always wanted to stress that it was a part of my game. And if it brought people to see the game, then they could see all the
other things that I could do. I didn’t want to just dunk, and that’s what my dad always tell me, like, “So you wanna just
be known as a dunker? “That’s all you wanna be known as?” And I’d be like, “No, I don’t—” – I don’t mess with pops, I’m rolling. – I get the break, I’m dunkin’ that. – Exactly. – Or I’m at least trying. – And I dunked in Donnie Crown
in a Christmas tournament. My sophomore year was my
junior, sophomore junior. And I woke up the next
day and they were like news cameras on our
lawn and all this stuff. And I was just like, it’s that big a deal? I didn’t really think of it
’cause my parents didn’t, my brothers were always like, “You soft.” And that’s kinda what motivated. We’re extremely at the dinner
table, that’s how we are. Like, oh, you had 30
today, like pass the salt. That’s just how we are,
and so I didn’t think of it as a big deal. To me, it was like what
I was supposed to do. My brothers did it, my brothers dunked, so why does it matter if I did? I don’t know, my parents were always– – Yeah, make it as a big deal. – Yeah, my parents were always like, “Girls can do what boys do.” So there was never a time
where they were like, you’re a girl, you can’t do that. So it was never a big deal to me. – Talk about winning the dunk contest at the McDonald’s game over
with Josh Smith, Jr Smith who are two, Josh Smith won the dunk
contest in the NBA, Jr Smith is one at all
times crazy dunkers. – I will go to my grave with this. All I did was make my dunks
and they missed their dunks. And so when everybody’s
like, dang, I’m like, you can’t win a dunk contest
if you miss your dunks. And that’s what happened. I just made mine, they missed theirs. And I remember the next day,
it was April Fool’s Day, like one or two days after that
and my brother was overseas and we called on the
phone from the hotel like, Hey Ian, I won the McDonald’s
all American Dunk Contest. And I won it. And he’d be like, “It’s April Fool’s.” I’m like, “Nah, forget
that, dah, dah, dah.” And so he had to wait
that he got the USA Today and saw it in the paper
before he believed us that we won. – I remember watching that
and being like this is crazy. And I remember being talking crap, like she from Chicago
though, so you already know it’s nothing new here. You know what I’m saying? But I was like, I
remember that was one of, I was really impressed with that. And like you said, they were trying crazy
stuff, but like you said, you made your dunks and
that’s what you gotta do. And I just remember being like, “Yo, she really wanted that.” And all the girls running around, like, that was sick,
that was something that– – For me in my head, ’cause
I was coming off of ACL, I just tore my ACL like six
or seven months before that. And I will tell you before I hurt my knee and I’ve had seven knee
surgeries since then. So obviously imagine, I could straight up before I hurt my knee do
way, I mean crazy dunks. And so for me, it was
like I’m gonna enter it just ’cause it’s a good
cause and not cause but like a good way to bring attention to women’s basketball. I really wish that I
could have done it before I had torn my ACL. – You was back to back player
of the year in high school. A lot of people wanna do that, a lot of people haven’t done that. That’s rare. You won in your junior year, your next year you came out
and then you chose Tennessee. What made you choose Tennessee outta everybody you could’ve chose? – My oldest brother, he
played professional basketball for a number of years in
the NBA as well as overseas. My middle brother is a doctor and when he was picking his school, he picked a school based on
him wanting to be a doctor. He went to Wash U, then he
went on to Johns Hopkins. He picked the best school to be a doctor. And for me, I wanted to
be a basketball player. I think people come out and are like, “Whoa, Whoa, Whoa, “you can’t aspire to be
a basketball player.” Like “No, that’s what I wanted to do.” And it didn’t mean that
that’s the only thing that I could do in college. I wanted to do communications, I wanted to be a basketball player and Tennessee had amazing,
we’re amazing at both. Women’s basketball, when
you can walk into an arena and say you’ve played in
front of 26,000 people at a Connecticut Game or you had
the highest attendance rate of almost 17,000 your
senior year in college, Knoxville’s eats, breathes,
sleeps, women’s basketball. We were second in midnight madness. We played second. The guys played first
and we played second. – That’s crazy. – So it’s like when you
had that and it was cool. It was like that was what, the guys respected it,
and that’s what it is. I think that’s– – I never knew that. – Yeah, Bruce Pearl came in and was like, “Listen, combined me and coach Summit “have won eight
championships, he’s won zero.” So we understood what it’s about, and I think it’s that respect
factor that coach Summit demanded, and I knew
that she would grow me as a basketball player, but
also as a human being. And she always spoke about,
you gotta be versatile. I can hear it, “Parker,
you’re versatile on the court, “you gotta be versatile off the court.” And that’s the reason
why I chose Tennessee. – Would you say the three
Meeks had any influence on that with the noise they was causing
up there, and the way they was playing and they was legendary of the women championship– – Mika Shameeka. Tennessee, to be honest with you, okay, I was attracted to Tennessee
because I wanted to go somewhere and bring a championship, but I didn’t want it to be like, I didn’t want to just
add to the greatness, if that makes sense. I wanted to be my own woman. So when they went on a little drought, that’s really what
attracted me to Tennessee. Because I think sometimes,
fans get spoiled when it’s just championship
after championship and then you make it to the
funnel four and they’re like, what happened? Or you make it to the golden
state fans just got spoiled. Like dude, y’all went to the finals! – Five years. – But you guys, you
know how many franchises would dream of that? So for me, I grew up watching
Shemeka Tamika and Tamika and the Meeks win championship
after championship. And then they didn’t win until ’07 or ’08, which was when we were there. And so you had this little
run during that span with Diana Taurasi and I was
like, okay, we’re about to bring Tennessee back. That’s kinda what
attracted me to Tennessee. – What did you give from
Pat Summitt that you took with you when you went to the WNBA? – Man, I’ve gotten in life, just, it’s not even basketball. She wasn’t big on tattoos,
but when she got sick, I don’t even know if I can pull it up. Let me see if I can pull it out. I’ve got a tattoo for her
because when she got sick, she always faced everything head on. So whatever journey, game,
whatever, it didn’t matter, she was gonna attack it and do her best. And so I asked her like, when
she got sick with Alzheimer’s, I was like, “What do you do? “How do you attack everyday?” And she’s like, “Left foot,
right foot, breathe, repeat.” And so I think just when
things get hard in life, on the court, whatever,
that’s what I take with me. She was an amazing woman,
I can remember one time in college, she got on me
the day before in practice and I was like, “All
right coach, I get it.” So the next day, I set my
alarm, we had six a.m. practice, I set my alarm for like 3:30,
I got to the gym at like 4:15 and I’m like, I’m gonna
be on a court sweating. When she gets here, I’m
gonna show her that I really, I pull up to the gym, her
lights on in the office. – She’s there already. – She’s already there. It’s just like every time you try to outdo Pat with Pat stuff, you’re
never gonna outdo her with things she says. And so even when she got
sick and even when things weren’t good, she still, ’cause it’s easy for people
to win championships and say all this stuff. Like, you gotta work
hard, you got or whatever. But she always backed
up everything she said. Take this, I’m not passing
on it by any means, it’s taken me a long
time to put it to work. But I think right now,
she would be really proud with how I attack life. – If you had to pick four
other players to play with– – [Candace] Uh-oh. – From Tennessee to play against Pat and the rest of the catalog
of the Tennessee Lady Vols, who’d the four other players be? – Who would I pick? I gotta go with Tamika
and Shemeka for sure. That’s three. – There’s curtains already. – I would say Daedra Charles,
RIP Daedra, she was amazing. She was the train and the
forward position was able to move mobile, all that. And then man, our point guard, we won two national
championships and on any day, I’ll take Alexis Hornbuckle over a lot of different players. So I think Alexis Hornbuckle. – You coming in and you
playing against legends, people that you looked up to
before you even got there. Just coming straight to there,
a lot of people don’t come, one pick and you’re
playing with Lisa Leslie, people look back on their
history and be like, man, Candace Parker and Lisa
Leslie play together. That’s crazy. As the history goes on,
people will be like, Dang, Magic played with Kareem? You know what I’m saying? It’s crazy to see legends, like
I’ve seen you play together. Like you had Sheryl Swoopes,
Cynthia Cooper, Tina Thompson, legends, hall of famers was
just like playing together. – Man, I looked at it. I’m a huge student of the game. So basketball is always
been on our television, something that we’ve read about. I can look up in the rafters
at almost any gym and tell you every person that’s got
their Jersey retired from across the country. So when I got to playing
with them, playing with Lisa, I knew the history, I knew what she meant to the game of basketball
and I knew it was similar to how San Antonio got Tim Duncan and David Robinson was hurt
the year before, Tim Duncan it was similar, Lisa Leslie
was pregnant the year before and I remember watching the standings and hoping that LA would drop. And it was interesting ’cause
Chicago was an expansion team. They were in that draft and
the Sky got the second pick. But I was hoping that
LA got the first pick and I remember when
they got the first pick, my middle brother Marcus
called me and was like, “Yeah, we’re going to Cali. “Going to Cali.” And that’s how it ended up. – That’s what’s up. So you playing with the Sparks
and you with Lisa Leslie, I know you feel like you
can win a championship with this team. Tell us about the first couple
of years with the Sparks and playing with that much heat and that much
expectation on your shoulders. – I’ll say this and I
know y’all are in a viral type of thing. If we were healthy in all
things, we should have won. She had her daughter the
year before I got drafted. That NCAA Tournament, I
was playing and reached and tore my labrum, my shoulder. So I was supposed to have
surgery and I was like, “No, it’s an Olympic year,
I’m the number one pick, “I wanna play, so put me
in the brace, whatever.” So I played, but my shoulder
just that year kept constantly popping out, like just
constantly popping out, whatever. We got to the Western
Conference finals and we lost on a last second shot. Sophia Young threw up some bullshit. And so we went to game
three, then Becky Hammon wanted to drop 35 on us. It’s ridiculous she was
doing all this shit. It was just ridiculous. Anyway, credit to them, they beat us, but that year, at the end of the year, I got Rookie of the your MVP
and I remember being like I was going for the threepeat ’cause we’d won the NCAA Tournament, Olympic Gold Medal and I wanted
to win a WNBA championship, all in the same year. We fell short the next year, little did I know I was expecting. I played the end of the
year, didn’t have any idea, and then that all season I was like, “Oh, so I’m going to be a mom.” And that year I came
back, but I wasn’t myself. I came back seven or eight
weeks after I had my daughter and it took time to get going. I’ve torn my ACL and then I had to sit out my freshman year in
Tennessee from a total knee reconstruction from where I
kind of already resurfaced and similar to microfracture
my freshman year. Tore my shoulder, I’ve had meniscus. There’s nothing harder than
coming back from a baby. You’re timing, I was 23 when I had her,
so I was pretty young. I was still working
out, it’s nothing like, your mind is like jump
and your body’s like three seconds behind. So it took forever and I
relied a lot on my athleticism. Rebound and pushing the ball and it was just like
your hips, everything. I had her May 13th, I came
back July 5th to my first game. – Wow. – And then I would say August,
September is when I started feeling like I could
play basketball again. It was a different challenge. And then Lisa retired after that year. So it was just like, what
could have been if both of us were really healthy and on
the court at the same time? But life happens and I’m so
blessed to have had my daughter and her be able to share my career. – I cannot fathom doing what my wife did. We share trying to be an
athlete and that being one of my priorities that I
have to deal with intense. For me, I had my children,
I thought I was playing, but even when just looking
at that whole process, thinking to myself, I would’ve
had a problem hooping, I felt like. And I’m not even the primary
guy, you know what I’m saying? Just being there just because
I was trying to be involved, like staying up whatever, they trying to get them
sleep, trained and all that. I would have been showing up like, you know what I’m saying? – Is that why you just
get to the next day? But I think the biggest
thing was just as an athlete, you have certain things
like a pre-game nap, I sleep two hours before the game. I have my pre-game meal, I nap, I get up, I shower, I do it this way. And it’s like every day is a different, you get her all ready for the game, then she throws up on all
everything and then you gotta change the outfit or the diaper bag and then, yeah, she did or she gets sick. I’ve missed a number of games ’cause this, my mom was to stay at home mom with us and when I’m sick to this
day, I still want my mom. And I want Layla to have that. I didn’t ever want her to be
like, well my mom was different ’cause she worked. I never wanted that. And so when she’s sick, shit shuts down. I have not made games,
trips, I’ve delayed overseas, my baby is number one. So it just went from basketball
being the be all end all to like, man, there’s more to
life, once I had my daughter. – Speaking on that, which was experience of having a daughter, like
seeing the changes and everything is being able to see BA and
reading about what Skylar went through, how do you
feel about all of the great advancements that have been made? And obviously he’s
still a lot of more work and further to go, but it was good seeing the improvements that were made. – I think it’s great
because I think all of us wanna leave the game better
than we came into it. And just to go into, we
didn’t have our own rooms as Rookies, you don’t get
it till your fifth year. So you share room
– That’s crazy! – You share a room like
you’re about to nap. – Kyle is right. Sharing the bathroom and
everything, that’s ridiculous. – Exactly. So when I had my daughter,
I nursed for 15 months. She had to go everywhere I went. And I was very adamant about
not sacrificing my career for my daughter and not
sacrificing being a mom for my career. I just wanted to have both. And so she went everywhere with me. My mom went with me, her
dad went with me sometimes and I’d have to buy the
other portion of the rooms, so to have to buy my room on the road, buy the airline ticket, figure out childcare– – Nanny, or anything. – Yeah, nanny, whatever. It just was really hard and
all that why trying to play and trying to– – Which is crazy. – And so now to see,
they’re gonna have a stipend or I guess I’m included in that. So we’re gonna have a stipend, we’re going to be able
to have maternity leave where you get your full
salary, stuff that you’re like, “Wow, you didn’t already have that.” That’s what I’ve heard a lot. – Seriously, I heard that ya’ll didn’t have like a family room. How do you not have a family room? You know what I’m saying? During the game, your kids
can go in and have somewhere that they cool, where it’s a
nanny and all of that stuff. Like every team I’ve been a part of NBA, we’ve had a family room where
it’s a whole separate place where they got food, they can get drinks, they can feel the people know them, they get badges and that
by the time the quarter of the season, they know each
other and they know our kids and they have nannies,
two, three, four of them. They rotate and everything
is taken care of and you don’t have these issues and it’s– – That’s not how it is. – That’s crazy. – But here’s the thing I do wanna say. The NBA hasn’t always been
what the NBA is right now. – [Quentin] Not at all. – It’s been a growing process. So we have to remember that
it is a growing process, but you are what you accept. And when the players decide it, listen, this is the way it’s gonna be. You’ve got to invest,
we talk about the impact David stern had, a lot of
the things he said and did at the time weren’t popular. – Right, yeah. – It was about progress. – Exactly. – The NBA was on tape delay in ’80s. I remember watching the
playoffs on tape delay. – Right. – So, we’re looking at a
finished product in the NBA and trying to compare it to the WNBA. So that’s where I’m like
hold on, let’s pause this, we’re our own league and we’re gonna try to be our own league. But in saying that, there
are some things that are non negotiable as a professional. – ‘Cause just to hear it, we fight for it. I love the WNBA, I love basketball, all kinds of basketball,
no matter where it is. We know about it, but just
go in details to hear y’all speak about it too in
details of like, look, we don’t have this, we’re sharing a room, we gotta wait for this flight. – We’re doing all this when
our main job was overseas. – And that’s crazy. – I made 20 times what I
made in the WNBA overseas, that’s how I fed my daughter. So we’re doing this to just grow the game. And so you’re adding that
to the fact that in Russia, I had a driver, a chef, we flew private, we had extravagant parties, they took my translator
to either translator, took care of my dog, we
have all these things. And so then we’re coming
back here to grow the game, but at some point, you’re like
at what cost are you gonna let some of these things go? – That’s like Diana Taurasi sayin’ she didn’t play the
one year and she stayed because they paid her. – [Candace] Mm-hmm. – That’s crazy. – And this is what I’m saying. I’m optimistic but I’m
cautiously optimistic because we still, we’ve come
a long way but we still have a long way to go and I
think that’s the way that we gotta look at it. And hopefully before too long,
we won’t have to go overseas. – Straight up. You finally get the opportunity to have a championship season and then that’s in a tough playoff run. Game five that you had to play. Tell us about that game and how the game came now to the end and y’all won it. – Well, we had it locked up. We were up two, one at home. Our owners had already
planned our championship. That night, we had vans waiting
for us and all this stuff. And we just couldn’t
finish it off at Staples. I remember going home and just, like man, all this we’d done all
year, it could be done. We could lose and all the work we put in could just be for nothing. And then our coach came in, Brian Agler the next day, and was like, “If somebody at the beginning
of the season gave you “one game to win a championship,
would you take it?” And I was like, “Hell yeah.” He was like, “All right,
this is that opportunity.” And we just changed our
outlook from, we lost it, and it was ours and they took it and get, to all right, let’s go. And we went out there and
just played in the moment in game five, a lot of
stuff happened, we’re up 10 with like a minute, 10 to
go, and almost lost it. They went up and then Necca
came down and had to hit a crazy put back at the– – Straight up. – So it was just represented our season, just how we just kept fighting
and it wouldn’t have gone any other way. I do believe strongly
in energy and I think you guys can feel it on a team. When the energy is
there, you win some games you shouldn’t win, just
because it’s positive energy. We talk about work environment,
we talk about things like even what y’all have,
there’s gotta be some sort of positive energy in any
relationship that you have that will take you further than you would if you were negative. – I agree with you 100%, but that’s not true with him. I don’t like this guy. I’m just playing. – That’s from the outside,
y’all can keep that inside. – The winner championship,
to finally win one, to be called a champion, you
used to see when you grew up, you see, like I say, the Sheryl
Swoopes, the Lisa Leslie’s, you see all these people
winning these championships. To be called a champion,
what do that mean to you to be called a champion in the WNBA? – First of all, in LA, if you’re a winner, you’re loved forever. And that’s how it was, and
I remember Michael Cooper telling me, Cooper was like,
“Listen, if you win in LA, “you’ll be fine, you’ll be great.” And that’s how I was,
to be called a champion. I’m a firm believer and people
can look up on one thing. So I believe in, you gotta win too, to be considered a real true champion, and I still believe that. In college, I said the
same thing in order for me to be able to be mentioned
with the greatest in college, I gotta win too. And it’s the same thing, I
feel that way in the WNBA and it feels great. But I think it’s more of
a reflection at the end of your career. ‘Cause we won, you put all the
effort and then you go home. And we talked about
this, we talk about this in the makeup room all the time at Turner. What’s your biggest feeling? Is it losing or is it winning? And for me, I remember losing
more than I remember winning. Winning, I feel like you move on faster. Losing, it’s like you’re in your bed– – You hold on to it–
– After seasons that you should’ve won, you’re in your bed. Like Layla is knocking
on the door, “Mommy, “you’re going to gonna come
out and open the blinds.” – You don’t wanna watch basketball on TV, you don’t wanna watch Sportscenter,
you don’t wanna watch– – Exactly, you don’t wanna watch anything and it’s like you, being a champion is great in
comparison to losing that year. I remember I’ve played 12 seasons. 11 of those, I can recall
the end of every season. I can go back to that place
in my mind and tell you exactly what I did after the game. Like it’s just the worst feeling ever. So I think it’s more of like
you don’t wanna feel that way. So you’re happy, you’re a champion. – Straight up. Who is your, not top, but your favorite five
women basketball players, or who’s your favorite five
that you love the most? – Cheryl Miller was before
her time in the sense that if Cheryl Miller had the
opportunities that we have now, I think she’d go down
as the greatest player in the history of basketball. There’s a little video and
tapes and obviously she played in the WNBA, but it
was way past her prime. But she’s a player that
the videos we did have, my dad showed me and she was
six, two, could do it all, at that time could dunk, could, the Jerry curl was
moving and transitioning. So, Cheryl Miller is definitely
one that I looked up to, obviously Cynthia Cooper, you look at that and that whole run during the time. And I think ’96 Olympics had a lot to do with where women’s
basketball is right now. They won the gold medal and
just the history started there. Talk about Lisa Leslie,
talk about Dawn Staley, I had the pleasure of
playing with Tisha Penacero. I remember the first time I saw her, my brother went to Bradley University and she was playing on the ODU team. And my brother went to the game ’cause somebody who’s talking to
who was on the girls’ team. And Tisha, dude, everybody on that team– – She’s alive. – No look passes, spinning, all that. – She was a show. – She was and so it was just, those are probably my top, my old school. – I know you got stuff
from different people, but who was the few people that
you pattern your game after, that you wanted to be like– – I grew up the biggest Allen Iverson fan and my brother got drafted
and then traded to Philly. – Like all of us. – Yeah, it sounds crazy.
– Crazy. – AI was on my wall,
I had the finger band. So my brother won one birthday,
got me his finger band and AI gave me his finger
band and I played with it every game of high school. That was my magic, what was it, Mike? not “Magic Mike,” I’m
quoting the stripper movie. Like Mike. – Like Mike, yeah. – Y’all looking at me
like yeah, “Magic Mike,” Like Mike– – So wait, is that why
you wore number three? – That is exactly why I wore number three. When I got to college, I
wore 32 for my dad ’cause that was his number. And then when I got to
college, it was retired, Deadra Charles had it. So it was retired. I was like, all right, I gotta
go back, I gotta go to AI. And so AI honestly, I
remember being out there doing all the like and
with mix tape stuff, an AI jumped up and hit it
off his elbow in that 2000 all star game, all that, I
tried all that in the driveway. So I would say him. I was a big Chris Webber fan
too, just because he was mobile and a forward and could
dribble and shoot and all that. And then just every, Dr. J, my dad had that on
repeat, of being able to go up. So when you watch me go to the basket, sometimes I get in trouble
’cause I’d be turning. – Yeah, putting it all out there. Yeah. – So it was just, yeah. – For you to be, you’re on the female Mount
Rushmore and you from the cribs. You know what I’m saying,
that we wear that. – Chicago has always been I think the measuring stick of basketball. And I don’t say that
without understanding, the huge impact that Chicago
has had on my career. I remember playing Marshall
and we beat them at Marshall and I remember the UIC
tournaments in the summer were that’s where you went. Hoop express, we went hoops, the gym, when you go and you figure
out if your game got better from the summer previous. And I remember going in
there and Michael Jordan was working out with
Tim Grover and watching through a window before we could get on the court to practice. All of that has had an impact
on who I am as an individual, but also as a basketball player. And like I said, when you
get respect from Chicago, doesn’t matter if anybody
else respects you. It really doesn’t. It means because it’s
different and that’s the thing, is you figure out every
single day if you’re as good as you have worked or
as you think you are. – She just said every single day. That’s the part about Chicago that people don’t understand. Like, oh, you won a
championship that don’t matter. This next game somebody’s
going to try and change check or you could hoop or you
could shoot, but you tough. If I knock you down,
are you going to get up? And that’s what, as we
create that toughness and that greatness that you
see from every single player, I don’t care, you name one. – And what’s insane is I
love looking at the history. I remember Derrick Rose in sixth grade, he played for Ferrari. My uncle coached Ferrari. Going and doing the same stuff you can do, was Rookie in second year. Going in there in sixth
grade, double pumping, jumping, doing this, the
labs, the floaters, all that. – The same thing he’s doing now. – In sixth grade, I remember that. And so it’s just really cool
to see the people from Chicago when they’re young because I think you see a lot of the– – [Darius] History. – History and people
are wowed and are like, “Oh man, you could do that.” No, he’d been doing this
in sixth grade, I remember. And just everything, I remember the Hoops, was it the Hoops prep show? – Chicago preps. – Sean Dockery and Kathy
Pondexter and they were all– – And Jason Straight. – [Candace] And I like dreamed of that. – Three the hard way. – Like I dreamed of that. And then it’s just funny because you see we only had two classes. There were none of this
27 classes where it was 27 state championships. – Single or, and double edged? – [Candace] It was single A and double A. – That was it. – We should’ve probably
had a playoff between single single A and double A, that would have been no
competition but single A and double A. And double A like– – The business. – Yeah, like let’s go. You had the city lead
champion, they came down. – That’s what I said now,
when we came through, they had city tournament. One team come out the entire
city and they rep the city. Now, people could lose city
and then four or three, four or five different teams still go out of city downstate. I was like, “How does this happen?” – That’s how it is. – Where did you live? ‘Cause I remember I’m
watching checking engine little Oakland and I’m
like, they lost city. I’m like, damn, could they go? Then it’s like no, they won state. I’m like how did they
lose city, but win state? Like what? – They changed all the rules, but I remember going
to see Sean Livingston. Sean Livingston was– – He was the deal. – No, so listen. Here’s the best story about SDot. The first time I ever met Sean Livingston, this is during my State
Championship, 1998. We’re in State Tournament, he’s
like this big halftime show. He’s out there on the
show, ba-da-da-da-da. Runnin’ around juvenile
ball up, big head kid, little bitty kid hair
bigger than his old body, basketball out there. He got it on a string,
that Sean Livingston. He grow up to be SDot. First time I ever met him, he
had to be like eight or nine. – Here’s the thing, my brother
played with at Bradley. He grew up near Peoria like Sean did. We went to a camp and played
against each other together. – That’s crazy. – At a camp in Peoria. And it’s just the connections. Everybody, we have certain
tournaments that you go to and the people that are trash
don’t go to those tournaments ’cause they know that they go
and get exposed that they go, so that’s Chicago. – That town plays country boys, nothing. – Yeah, ’cause no small
school. you wanna be, I was from a small school,
so you wanna be accepted from the big city. That’s why we used to be so aggressive. And so coming up– – In Seattle, everybody
thought I was soft, so they would all try to test me downtown. – They used to think I was
so ’cause I was skinny, but I was tough as a motherfucker, but because I was skinny– – All 185 pounds of him. – My physique looked
like, oh, he’s skinnier than a motherfucker. – And I didn’t look like it buzz. – No. – It buzz, it was 185 at six, nine. Bro, it was frail. – But I was an animal,
just move me around. – I ain’t say that, I said
you physically and you look, you were small. – Here’s the question I have for y’all, ’cause we asked this. Does Chicago claim KG? Is KG Chicago? – [Quentin] No. – No? – No. – Okay, let me ask
another another question. Does Chicago basketball claim KG? – Yeah, we were claiming
for it for that senior year ’cause he did legendary stuff
and he came out of Chicago straight to the high school. But you can’t, I don’t think he would claim Chicago. – I think he’d claimed
Chicago, but I think Chicago made him. – Oh no, we definitely, we impacted– – [Candace] Not made him– – Not made him but we impacted. – [Candace] Impacted, yeah. – Absolutely, a million percent. And we can’t wait to have him on here ’cause I want to talk about it. I want to that from the where at West where
he played it, so you know. – I remember watching him. – What? That was Epic! Trust me, when he touched down
on the city, it was crazy. – He’s trying to explain to
people that it’s similar, everybody’s hype about
Bronnie and Zaire or– – [Quentin] Anybody– – Anybody playing there. I’m like you don’t realize
it was two of the best in high school teaming up
together to play at one, one coming from out-of-state to play. – [Quentin] It’s crazy. – Like how D Rose through. So proud of D Rose and see where he– – That’s the thing. I think people still don’t
understand the impact that he had in, when Chicago had the pick, I
didn’t want to go to Chicago to play at home. I didn’t want to do that. And D Rose went to Chicago and played. – And holdin’ it down. – And put it down, put
it all the way down. – He brought that light that
you ain’t have and Chicago since Mike and them left. It was like it was a whole
new energy in Chicago. – Even with the, I’ll go a step further, ’cause even with what Mike and them did, he had a step further ’cause
his homegrown, organic, he legit from, for real, he’s the rose that grew from the cement. – Talk about D Rose, it was like, oh it was great. – I just think iconic moments. Like when he was in high
school and was playing at the United Center, cock
back, hit him with his chest, – Let’s do red so hard back, what are you doing? – When I first started hearing about it. It was like, man, send me, I
got a young boy over there, this is when he was as sophomore. When I first ever see them play. And they said, “Yeah. “This boy they say gave him Benji number.” I said, “Oh.” That was like an indicator to
make you turn your head like, “Wait, what?” Like okay, like let me see what’s up. – But the crazy thing too was
I went and watched a workout. I was coming back from having
my daughter and my trainer was working, trying to
get me back into it. And D Rose and Westbrook were
working out before my workout. I have never seen anybody not slow down when they cross over. You know how you, okay. It’s the same speed, I have
never seen that in my life. And their workout, it was– – Them two right there like
D Rose in his prime and– – [Candace] And before he got here– – Westbrook throughout. Those are two most explosive
point guards we’ve ever seen. Ja Morant trying to catch up now, he coming along here. He sounds passionate, but them two– – Ja is different. – Trust me, Ja Morant, young boy fresh. I’m telling you, I talk
about him all on my show. – [Candace] Skinny. – Yeah, but it don’t, – Wait till he puts a little muscle on, ’cause he flexes and I’m like stop. – No, I’ll allow it because when I seen him go down the lane and he took off on Aaron
Bangs and then just like Aaron Bangs, lay people down, he flushed him and went, kept going. He kept going back, boy. I said, “Oh this young
boy, he is impressed, “he’s special.” – Yeah, he’s psychin’ them up. – I just don’t the MO of
like point guards like that. That’s what I’m saying. I wish when I was younger,
somebody would have just taught me how to control it because I was fearless
and wirey and just like did all this and went to the hoop and it’s like there’s a way
to land, there’s a way to– – If D Rose had the
gears he take now before, if he was able ’cause
like now, you can see he can slow it down but before, he used to be a million miles away. – And that’s what I’m
saying, it’s like Westbrook, you look at D Rose, you
look at a Ja, which I hope now medicine has caught
up where they’ll teach him how to do other stuff. – [Darius] Slow it down a little bit. – That’s what happened to Steve Francis. His knee went out– – Just look at all the wirey
explosive, it doesn’t– – Well ’cause you’re going, you only got so many jumps in you. – Talk about how you
made the transition and got into the media and where
you are now with Turner and you have your own
podcast with Kristen Ledlow. Y’all getting it in, had Kobe on already. Didn’t y’all have Charles? – Yeah, we’ve had a Chuck,
Kobe, Robin Roberts, we’ve had Allyson Felix, we had a number of really cool people. – [Darius] They’re working out here. – [Quentin] Big time. – They’re working out here. – I mean trying to– – You know what I’m saying? – Your people have to call us our people. – You know what I’m saying? – No, it was something I really enjoyed. I’m sitting on my couch watching
basketball, talking shit. So why not– – Exactly. – Why not get paid to do it? – [Both] Hennessy. – Exactly. So it ended up being like the
second best job in the world to me, other than playing basketball. So playing basketball was number
one, and talking about it. It was just a no brainer. – The only difference
between the two is you ain’t going to hurt yourself doing it. – Exactly, it’s like I can
go out the night before and drink with Chuck and talk on air. But I think it was that,
but the transition was I did not want to go overseas. I went to China and my daughter, she went to preschool in Russia. She went over with me to Istanbul, she’s been to China with me twice, we spent Christmases in
China, France, everywhere. – She might have been to more countries than me already, damn. – She was speaking Russian
with a little black girl with puffs, talking about
previa, like straight up Russian. It got to the point
where she was like eight and Layla was my homie,
that’s like my best, she’s just my soul for sure. And every time I tell her like, all right, we’re going someplace. She’s be like, “Great, okay
mommy, when are we leaving? “Let me get my stuff.” Whatever, her school
was great work with us. This last time, I told her
we were going to China. She said, “Okay mommy.” And turned her head
and she started crying. You could see it was starting
to really affect her, and I was like, “There’s gotta
be a happy balance of where “I can have a living but then
also allow my daughter to “have activities, “have friends in the
States always have to,” and to be consistent. And so Turner obviously I watch T&T, everybody watch T&T “Inside the NBA.” Everybody watches that NBA TV. If you’re a fan, you’re watching NBA TV. That was me, and it was always
on 216 on NBA TV always. So that’s how I started. I was looking at that and
came in for one or two things in the studio just to
fill in for somebody. And then “Area 21” was
when it really kicked off and I was on with KG, all star one time and then
went on the show a couple times and it was just great vibes,
makeup room just with him, with everybody, all the talent. Then the next year, they
asked me to do “Players Only.” So I did “Players Only” and then one of the talent took a job in the NBA. And so they were like,
“Hey, you want to fill in?” I was like, “Perfect.” And so that’s when it was
two years ago when I started consistently going to Atlanta. And now, I just love it. The people is really what,
’cause like your teammates can make you want to come to practice. – That’s exactly what it is. – Have you ever been on teams
that have been successful and it’s just like you
don’t like the people? And it doesn’t matter how
much success you have, if you don’t mess with
the people you work with or your teammates, is miserable. – If it’s negative energy around– – Telling you. – That’s 100% what it is. It turned to like I’m there
now and been there last year and a half, and like you said,
it’s like you’re going there, you got a great group
of teammates that you’re about to go hang out with. – You know they have your back. – Y’all about to sit down
and talk crap, hang out, kick it and have a good time. Literally, you go in there and order food, do your production means and
then you get your work done. But it’s like are you
hanging out type vibe? We never feel like we
had worked really like– – Like the makeup room, is never. – Music playin’, I’m talking about– – Everybody is talking,
it’s not just talent, it’s the makeup, it’s the people. Mickey, it’s everybody. – I know what I want to ask. So when you, when you
start getting that bread, not the politically correct thing, what you went and splurge on? Did you look back on like,
yeah, that was a young candy stripe there. – [Candace] That was a young mistake. – But like, I don’t even live mistake, sometimes we do. So you gotta treat yourself a little bit, work real hard, you earned it. – That’s a good point. I don’t know if I ever bought
anything that was crazy, but I’m real particular about my vacation. I think I took way more
extravagant vacations than my means at the
beginning stage of my career. And that was my big
dream, was just to have, just go on a dope vacation and just– – Nice week. – Yeah, nice week, bring the
people that I wanna bring, have a good time. – And we know that could be costly. – Yeah, I got that bill like damn. Why did you drink so much orange juice? – Who was a walking bucket? Who’s a woman’s player that every time you see
like she get buckets? – Simone Augustus, I played
against her in college at LSU and then when
she came to Minnesota, they weren’t good, her first, I don’t know how many years, but she would get 30 every, and we would be doublin’. Like we know where the
basket was coming from. Like nobody else can score on their team, we got to stop her. And she would still get a bucket. That little fade shot over her head, you couldn’t block it, you knew that the right to
left was gonna come back, you knew it still got crossed. It was, she to me is one
of those players that, especially in her prime. – We had Big Baby on
hand, he was telling me at their high school,
she was the best player. Even though they was whatever in the area, she was the best player, Be Best and her went to the same high school. I’m like we were teammates
with the magic and he used to be like man listen. He was all American, all of that, she had more college coaches and people come to the school for
her to anybody, for sure. – 1000%. Woman was crazy. She still gets buckets but– – Like you to be arguably the
best female basketball player ever, how did that feel? What you dreamed of, you
came up and you’re seeing male side and female side
basketball and you just, now you’re arguably the best player ever. You know what I’m saying? Your career is gonna be
matched up with so many people’s career to be one of
the best female players ever. How does that feel? – I think the biggest thing for me was I was always about versatility
and above crossover appeal. And I think the thing
that I really respect is when some of the best dudes
come up to me and they are like, you know in Chicago, you
get that nod of respect, and you get it. And I almost hold onto that
more than even nationally. I think when I got that
respect in Chicago, I remember I came down and
played at a USC tournament against Cappie Pondexter. And Cappie Pondexter
was like, you talk about Mount Rushmore, like
in Chicago basketball, not just female basketball. Talking about male, female, all that. Cappie Pondexter, I was in eighth grade and I came up to Cappie and was like, “Hey, I’m Candace Parker.” She’s like, “I know who you are.” I was like, “Oh you do.” She knows who I am, and I
think that to me is when, ’cause then men see
what they’re gonna see, women see what they’re gonna see, but when you get that
crossover appeal of both, is when I think you
really have the respect. – Yeah, ’cause I used to hear about you long time ago and when Cappie came, I was a big Cappie Pondexter
fan ’cause we used to play against their high school all the time. – Yeah, Marshall. – And then after she went out, I always paid attention
to her until you came in. For you to be so dominant
and just so versatile, you was different. I feel like you was like me,
I was a different type of player that they never really seen before. And you was the same way, you
was tall, you can dribble, you can shoot, you know what I’m saying? You could post up like you
did, every single thing. It’s like he was the one that, like the Tamika Catchings,
when she came out, she was a versatile type player, but
you took it to an extreme. And girls coming behind
you, now it’s just– – I just laugh because the
NBA now, we’re coming up, it was like the fours ran
the middle of the floor, they reversed the ball,
they ran over, they scream, then they popped or they rode. And it was like, I remember rebounding
the ball and pushing it and coaches being like, “Hold on, no. “Forwards can’t push the ball.” – That’s what they used to do. – And so it’s just fighting through that, and now you see where, and this is what I laugh
about all the time. You had forwards in
yourself and Lamar Odom and even like Dirks not athletic
wise but just dark wise. And now you see Yannis and you’re like that is the reason why
it is the way it is. And so it’s always like a steady point, and when I came into the
league, I can say it now, there weren’t forwards
that were pushing the ball and hittin’ the ball. And the NBA likes to claim that they were the first to have the
forward to push the ball. No, but I think it’s just
about changing the game and about progress and
the evolution of it. – Let me ask you this,
’cause when it was okay for me to get the ball
off the board and push it, I had to always dunk it. I know if I got this ball
off this board and push it, I either gotta lay it up, go
coast to coast and lay it up or go coast to coast and dunk
it for my coach not to say nothing to me. Was that the same like we asked for you? ‘Cause I know they’re
telling you not to do it and when you finally do it, you’re like. So I know when I get
this ball and I push it, I either got to make a play for somebody or I got a score that would
get you to confidence. – At the beginning, it was like that. – It’ll get you confidence to do it. – At the beginning, it was like that. But I think as we started
going back and there were more advanced stats,
more things like that. I remember there was a stat at Tennessee of when I rebounded the ball,
our percentage of scoring when that happened. And it was significantly
higher than anywhere else and it’s not by accident. So I think when those
stats came into where, obviously I had to keep my turnovers down, but even just a simple give and go, how hard it is to train your body, I don’t want a guard that. If somebody is dribbling
down, ’cause guards they move their feet, you
don’t do all that, whatever. Pose, we don’t want to do that. I’m trying to guard an ice on that side, I’m trying to hedge and get back to mine, I need help on the recovery. – I gotta run hard to get back. – Yeah, I got to run back and all that. I don’t wanna guard
all that in transition. – It felt good to hear something that they didn’t want you to do, like now, you hear a coast to be like, hey, when you get the ball, push. ‘Cause being as a big man or
being labeled as a big man, the first thing they’d be
like get it to the guard. But now when they see it, they’d be wanting to be
repetitive every game. No, you get the ball, push. – You push it, yeah. No, it’s like that. – And you are like they
weren’t doing that. You play center sometimes
and you’re setting it up. Like that’s transcendent,
you know what I’m saying? Like girls basket, maybe not
girls, I’m sorry probably, women’s basketball, like
a whole different level. It’s changing because of you. – Well I think it’s a
lot of different things. I don’t know, you guys have
probably been told not to do a move a million times. – Yeah. – How many times has a coach,
like Pat was against me using my left hand because my dad, if I didn’t use my
left hand on the left side, I had 20 pushups when I got home. Why didn’t you, ’cause when
you play better competition, then that’s getting blocked. So if you come through and
shoot, no that’s getting blocked. That’s how it was. And so for me, if I would go
in and miss a left handed shot, coach would be like “Just
use your right hand.” And I’d be looking in the
stands like, “But my dad–” – I think that’s, like now, we talk about
looking at the game. Women’s and man, it’s just
looking at the game now. I’ve seen different people talking about, I saw Powell wrote an article saying how some of the things
that people randomly do just playing. Man, we’d a guy benched, we
had a guy exile to the bench, screamed down and everything
else been on the film. The next day, “Who do you think you are? “You’re disrespecting the game,” all of this different
stuff people would like. And it’s no disrespect to look, I’m just saying it’s a different area, that we would get, man listen. And some of the celebrating too– – But I also think like we
probably wouldn’t have survived Twitter and Instagram. ‘Cause like at college, Instagram came out like two years after and
Twitter was just starting when I was in college. I wouldn’t have wanted
social media and all that. And so now, it’s more of entertainment. Even at high school, you look
at now it’s entertainment. That’s gonna get more clicks. Coaches can’t be like,
nah, don’t show emotion ’cause Zeke says that
all the time in a studio, like Ja celebrated, he was like, “Oh he would’ve got messed up.” Next time down the court. It’s just entertainment. – He’s still in that era. – His ego ain’t never
not gonna be in that era. – Him and Mchale, I’ll be in here like– – Best stories ever though. – They have the best stories. – How do you feel when you see some of these young girls now? it’s like really out here banging, saying, I’m sure y’all on Instagram,
we all know social media. And you see just some
of the clips and you see the girls at a young age, just
how the game has expanded. Not only with some of the girls
being athletic in dunking, but just how their games
have expanded so far. What do you feel about that,
where the game is going for females and both girls in general? – I love it and I’ve
always been a big believer in the fact that you
have to have access and exposure and you gotta see it first. Training, eating at an earlier
age, understanding that you can be an athlete and it
hasn’t always been like that. And so I think now, we’re
seeing the transition of growing up and how
beneficial it is to grow up seeing people like yourself on television and seeing women athletes. I think it’s just as important
for my niece to see it as my nephew as well
because I think it changes the narrative. My trainer right now,
I was the first female that he had trained. Trevell Gains, he trains everybody. Everybody in league, he
trains everybody in the NFL. And he was like, “Wow,
before I trained you, “I didn’t really, I respect it now.” I’m like, “Yeah–”
– We do stuff too.” – We can jump too. So it’s about exposure and I’m excited about
where the game’s going. – So, you know, we gotta
show love and appreciation, you know what I’m saying? D Miles’ creation. – [Darius] The black box. – The black box. – [Candace] I freakin’ love it. – We’re try and show
love to ya’ll comin’ out. – Thank you. – Get you a littler merch and everything. – Thank you so much. – We got very, very gracious partner, you know what I’m sayin’? This is very special, Hennessy V.S.O.P with a special Knuckleheads edition. – Yo, you all got the, damn. – You know, we out here are trying to– – Thank you so much, thank you. I appreciate, I really enjoyed it. – Yes. – Yes. – So, when I wear this,
I’m gonna tag ya’ll. – No doubt, no doubt.

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